GSV AuditValue

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  • #3726
    Cajun ConfiguratorSean Terrell
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    Gurus,

    trying to poll a LINT system value as a DINT[2] with kepware for program change detection.

    I can’t seem to get it straight from memory, and I have to use a GSV function to put AuditValue into DINT array.

    Anyone know how to access that system namespace with kep driver?

    #3729
    Mister IncredibleMister Incredible
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    Hi Sean,

    I suspect that you would be limited as these attributes, fields, variables, or members (whatever you want to call them) are at the object/class level (if you’re familiar with OOP). Rockwell uses the GSV, SSV to provide controlled access to these “protected” field members. I don’t think Kepware provides a mechanism to access them directly…maybe I’m wrong? If you figure out a way to do it be sure to share!

    Cheers!

    #3732
    Cajun ConfiguratorSean Terrell
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    Bob,  I mean Mr Parr,

    I Havent invested too much time into it yet, so I will spend some time on this tomorrow. I didnt think that one could access that area, but I am concerned that if I am using the AuditValue for change detection wouldnt someone be able to AFI the rung doing the GSV and freeze it?

    I also noticed that all of the changes that I was making in the PLC while I had Kep ware open and connected, I saw event notices in the quick client for “PLC online change complete” so unless that is due to kepware being local, how does that work?

    #3734
    Mister IncredibleMister Incredible
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    LOL. You’re a fan I see…well done!

    Yes, I get your concern. One way to ensure this won’t happen, and while I usually try not to in most cases, is to abstract the critical pieces of code that you don’t want altered or touched and lock it down with source protection. If the code abstraction is done with care and it is tried and true (it needs to be bullet-proof) then there really should be no reason anyone would need access or to alter it. If modifications are needed, they will need to call you to make them.

    I know there’s nothing worse than opening a program and seeing source protected code, however, if done right it can be leveraged to protect intellectual property and prevent “fat-fingered” or mindless changes. It really should be a non-issue, especially for what you’re looking to do.

    Cheers

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